Colleges are drastically changing application requirements due to COVID-19

Studying+and+taking+the+SAT+or+ACT+is+very+stressful+and+time+consuming.+Pic+Cred%3A+Ben+Mullins

Studying and taking the SAT or ACT is very stressful and time consuming. Pic Cred: Ben Mullins

Gabby Lerner

Applying for college is difficult and stressful and adding a pandemic to that makes everything more exhausting. Many high school seniors are left wondering if the SAT and ACT will be required this year due to COVID-19.

 

The SAT and ACT can make or break if one gets into their dream college. However, this may change for the class of 2021. 

 

The test taking process consists of hours of tutoring and studying, and a full day in a cramped classroom with dozens of other students. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, SAT and ACT testing sites are not safe and do not follow the “six feet apart” rule. 

 

Because of all of the new rules and regulations, many colleges are currently “test optional”, meaning you can submit your score if you have taken the SAT and/or ACT, but it’s not mandatory. Large schools like Boston University, University of California and its school systems, Oregon public universities, Tulane University, Northeastern University, and more have announced that they will be “test optional” for 2020-2021 applicants.

 

Some colleges have gone far enough as suspending the need to take the SAT and ACT entirely. Click here to find out which colleges have waived SAT/ACT.

 

However, many colleges are still requiring test scores, making high schoolers hesitant and nervous. 

 

Senior, Hayley Newton thinks that submitting a score should be optional for all colleges. “A lot of people have health conditions or family members that have health conditions, so they are not comfortable sitting in a room for that long with others.” 

 

Furthermore, Newton explains, “Right now, it’s really hard to get a testing date.” This means that high schoolers will have less opportunities to take the exams. This will result in more crowded classrooms and a higher risk factor of contracting the coronavirus.