Review of Lana Del Rey’s “Let me love you like a woman”

Lana on the set of her self-edited music video for LMLYLW. The video was a call-back how she created videos earlier in her career. A collage of vintage photographs, old writing and poetry, and low production videos of her filmed on a MacBook. This video marks a turning point back into self-production.

Interscope

Lana on the set of her self-edited music video for LMLYLW. The video was a call-back how she created videos earlier in her career. A collage of vintage photographs, old writing and poetry, and low production videos of her filmed on a MacBook. This video marks a turning point back into self-production.

April McBride, Staff Writer

Let Me Love You Like A Woman is LDR’s lead single off of her upcoming 7th studio album “Chemtrails over the country club”. The song, created in classic Del Rey fashion is a slow melodic track with romantic Americana inspired lyrics. It is the journey through the tenderness of a relationship, presumably written about Lana’s recent ex-flame star of Live PD Sean ‘Sticks’ Larkin. The track is also about returning to a small town life after leaving many years before. Lana herself moved from Lake Placid, a small village in New York countryside that had a population of only 2,200 in 2018 to the flashing NYC after boarding school when she was eighteen. Now she is finding that maybe the lures of city life weren’t what they seemed. 

Lana starts the piece’s chorus with “I come from a small how about you? I only mention it because I’m ready to leave LA and I want you to come”. This line is a breakaway from Lana’s worldview thus far. LA is every recurring character in her universe, this seems to show LA is on its last straw for her. The city’s ever-changing expectations have made her begin to reminisce back onto her tumultuous childhood in Lake Placid. This song is a nod to small town living. To have a small world where you and your lover exist, covered in landscape and drunk with time. In the next verse Lana sings “Let be who I’m meant to be”, she is not forgetting the work and trouble that brought her here from the city into this new era but is not stuck to that image of herself. The line serves as a message to both her lovers and fans to let her be whoever she is meant to be, as interchanging as that is. 

This track also serves to show the tenderness of even a toxic relationship. The beauty and strength found in a solid partnership between two individuals. Lana has stated that she is “always looking for a meaningful moment”. Lana tells her current lover “talk to me in poems and songs, don’t be bittersweet”. Lana is a force to be reckoned with in the industry and is still a teenaged poet at heart, wanting real love in a small town. She alluded to Prince’s 1894 ‘Purple Rain’ with  “We could get lost in the purple rain, talk about the good ol’ days”. A track that draws images of an entangled relationship that keeps surviving. This sentiment is similar in LMLYLAW. The daily task of maintaining an adult relationship that spans over years. 

This song is an exciting introduction to her new project but her tracks are starting to blend together at this point. Though Lana’s recent notes on the album leave hopefulness about a possibly full-folk project. The album is set for digital release in March 2021, and her new Americana cover albums are set for Christmas.