Review of Pink Floyd’s Album “Animals”

Nate Baker, Staff Writer

In 1977, Pink Floyd released their 8th album, “Animals.” One of their least popular albums commercially, but a fan favorite, “Animals” is depressingly realistic and clashes with and defines ideas of class, separation, and ideas of indoctrination.  

Pig flying through two chimneys of the Battersea Power Station, a recreation of the famous album cover. (Credit: dreamtime.com stock photos)

This album lasts for 42 minutes, and the song titles include, “Pigs on the Wing 1,” “Dogs,” “Pigs (Three Different Ones),” “Sheep,” and “Pigs on the Wing 2.” The longest song on this album is “Dogs,” coming in with a 17 minute and 8 second runtime. The shortest song is “Pigs on the Wing 1,” with a runtime of 1 minute and 24 seconds. 

As you may have guessed, “Animals” is loosely inspired by Animal Farm, a 1944 novel by George Orwell, which also is based on similar ideologies that uses farm animals as an example of separate social classes. 

Pig flying through two chimneys of the Battersea Power Station, a recreation of the famous album cover. Credit: dreamtime.com stock photos. 

My favorite song on this album is “Dogs,” because of the guitar solo and the lyrics, which talk about the dogs, which stand for the hungry working class that is portrayed as always fighting each other. I rank the songs from “Dogs,” “Pigs on the Wing 1,” “Pigs (Three Different Ones),” “Pigs on the Wing 2,” and in last place, “Sheep.” 

This album has a strong message, written by Storm Thorgerson, and Roger Waters, strong lyrics, and great guitar play. If you are a progressive rock fan, or just a rock fan in general, I heavily encourage you to listen to this album and check out their other works.